Snowy road

Snow on the sidewalk

One of the perennial chores of city dwellers in northern climates is the shoveling of snow from the sidewalk. The common practice for most cities is to require residents to remove snow and ice from the sidewalk adjacent to their property within a few hours of snowfall. Residents who fail to remove the snow face fines and citations for causing a hazardous condition on the sidewalk.

House on a snowy street
House on a snowy street with a shoveled sidewalk

In contrast, city and county highway crews are responsible for clearing snow from roadways. This makes sense considering the scale and efficiency gained by using heavy duty plow trucks. The costs of plowing roads are generally borne by all taxpayers within the municipality.

Ordinances requiring residents to remove snow from sidewalks have come under scrutiny of late by pedestrian advocates. These rules place a serious burden on elderly people and people with disabilities who may not be able to easily shovel their sidewalks. Residents incapable of taking care of their own sidewalk are forced to choose between relying on the goodwill of an able-bodied neighbor, paying for someone’s labor, or risking a citation.

Unevenly plowed sidewalks also make it substantially more difficult get anywhere on foot during the winter. Many trips in urban areas are short and could be completed by walking as long as sidewalks are safe to use. A requirement on residents to clear their sidewalks is a recipe for inconsistency as there will always be some people who are unable or unwilling to comply with the ordinance.

Thankfully, some snowy cities have taken steps to help pedestrians get through the winter safely and efficiently.

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