South Hill Elementary School playground

Playground hopping

This summer we had to get creative and figure out ways to keep Rowan entertained while doing our best to prevent the spread of Covid. That meant we spent a lot more time outdoors than we had ever imagined possible.

While playgrounds were off limits in the early days of the pandemic we did our best to avoid even saying the word aloud. Explaining that “playgrounds are closed” to a two-year-old is basically like telling him that his birthday is cancelled and all his toys have been melted down for scrap. No bueno.

South Hill Elementary playground was closed due to Covid as of April 2020

Thankfully most playgrounds did re-open and research showed that Covid was not easily spread by touching objects. Armed with hand sanitizer, we felt prepared to accept the risk of playing outdoors starting in July.

Now that summer is drawing to a close, it seems like a good time to reflect, and consider: what makes a great playground? In my view, there are at least four factors to consider:

  • Fun – the playground needs to be engaging and offer a variety of activities for kids of various ages and abilities.
  • Parent spaces – there should be space for adults to watch their kids comfortably.
  • Picnic areas – tables or grass for a snack break allow families to spend more time outdoors.
  • Restrooms – when you gotta go, you gotta go.

The ratings below are loosely based on these criteria.

Continue reading
Cayuga Waterfront Trail near NYSDOT facility

If I had three million dollars…

(Set to the tune of the Barenaked Ladies 1992 hit)

A few weeks ago a NYSDOT maintenance facility in Ithaca went up for auction with a starting bid of $2.85 million. You know it’s going to be special when there’s a fancy video!

The eight acre site is situated between the Ithaca Farmer’s Market and the Cornell Boathouse. It is surrounded on two sides by the Cayuga Waterfront Trail.

Efforts to relocate the NYSDOT facility off this prime real estate have been happening for at least twenty years. Whoever buys this is clearly not going to use it as a yard for road salt, dump trucks, and highway signs. (In case you’re curious, the maintenance facility is moving to a site near the airport.) A 2016 study [large PDF] looked into redevelopment options for the site.

By next week the winning bid should be announced, but it may take longer for details about redevelopment to emerge.

The site is a bit disconnected from Ithaca’s primary street grid – the only route for vehicular traffic is via 3rd Street. Crossing Route 13 on foot or bike at 3rd Street is a bit nerve-racking even when traffic is light. While there are crosswalks, due to the geometry of the intersection it takes a long time to cross the highway on foot.

Continue reading

If highways are a drug, trails are treatment.

Something interesting happened during the nine years I lived outside of Ithaca – it grew a network of trails into its surrounding towns. A glance at the county’s bicycle map shows how these pedestrian friendly tendrils connecting downtown and campuses to rural hamlets. Dig deeper into the Priority Trails Plan and you will find a vision for an even more robust network of non-motorized trails.

Trails can be an important part of a treatment to our national addiction to highways. Yonah Freemark made this striking analogy on his blog, The Transport Politic:

“For American cities, highways are a drug. They’re expensive to acquire. They devastate healthy tissue and arteries, replacing previous modes of nourishment with destructive ones. They force the rest of the body to adapt to their needs, and they inflict pain on those nearby.”

Trails connect communities and open up recreational opportunities. Compared to highways, trails are a bargain (often an order of magnitude less expensive).  Trails enable physical health as people use them to walk, run, or bike.

Trails can help rekindle human connections. On a trail a group can hold a conversation without distraction. (Interestingly, social connection is seen as a treatment to drug addiction.)

While it’s common to hear objections to trail projects on the basis of increased crime or lower property values, new trails have been shown time and time again to be reliably safe and a benefit to neighborsContinue reading